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they be john mccain or lindsey graham or other senators who have spoken out against her, i doubt it. we live in a age when if there's a fight to be had, a fight will be had. there is always political advantage being sought here, and i don't think this is going to mean anything in terms of a softening of the president's -- or opposition to the president's agenda or other appointments that might come down the line. speaking of which, one of the odder by-products of this entire episodes as it has dragged on is the republican endorsement of john kerry for that job. we've heard an endless stream of republicans come forth and endorse john kerry. as a matter of fact, i just saw john kerry coming out of a briefing on, guess what? a closed briefing from the dni, james clapper, on benghazi. senators were being presented with new photographic and video evidence that chronicled what happened that night, september 11th, of course, the night of the attack that claimed the life of ambassador chris stevens and others. john kerry did not stop. there's no medimmediat -- anoth scrum waiting to see what his rea
. john mccain, lindsey graham from south carolina seemed more furious after they came here than beforehand. so it seemed pretty clear susan rice's nomination, if it were submitted, would be a serious fight that perhaps the president did not want at this point with so much else he's trying to get accomplished heading into his second term. >> gretchen: back to ed henry. i'm wonder, is john kerry cracking the champagne right now? >> there's no doubt. i was speaking to a democrat a few moments before the news broke who was telling me around town a lot of people in senator kerry's orbit are talking about the likely possibility. i will also add to our point about the dira
mccain. you said since john mccain and lindsey graham are like a human circular centipede -- they're like a senator-pede, part of the same organism. >> they keep feeding and defecating the same talking points into each other's mouths constantly. >> stephanie: lindsey graham of course repeated exactly what john mccain said. as you say they eat the same [ bleep ] in an endless loop. like a senator-pede. >> the siamese senators. and it's become so boring on sunday mornings. you know. now it is either mccain, graham or which other boring senator is going to be on there? >> stephanie: at any rate, i was saying -- what is your prediction on the susan rice thing? i've heard people saying he's not going to nominate her now. it is a shame. it really is. >> no, i think that at this point, if he were to nominate her, it would be a direct confrontation. it could be a way to call them out. and to say -- and to force them to say okay, what do you really have? i think -- i don't know. i think he's in a confrontat
critical of susan rice in the republican party in the senate, in particular john mccain and lindsey graham, if you look at the records of susan rice versus john kerry, you would assume that ideologically susan rice, a little bit closer to a mccain or a graham, a little more of an interventionist, if you will. think about where she was on libya. where john kerry, much more cautious, as many veterans are when it comes to military conflicts, when it comes to u.s. intervention. so i think that, you know, the president certainly was getting advice saying, this is going to be a tough lift. you can get her confirmed. but just keep that in mind. you've got a lot of issues to go through, congress. and if you don't think she is the best person over and above everybody else, ask yourself whether you want that kind of fight or not. so look, i think that susan rice handled this very well. and now his position -- the next big opening is hers. >> you're our political director, chuck. what does this do to the republican party? who got absolutely skewered in the last campaign, especially among voters who w
critical of her, including senators john mccain and lindsey graham. they will have much more on "the situation room" as this news is just coming out, what this means. let me get to the statement here, the statement from the white house. quote, i spoke to ambassador rice and accepted her decision to remove her name -- this is the president -- remove her name from consideration for secretary of state. it goes on. for two decades susan has proven to be an extraordinarily capable, patriotic, and passionate public servant. as my ambassador to the united nations, she plays a role in american's interest. she has secured international support in sanctions against korea and stood up for sudan and stood for the human rights of all people. it goes on to say that he's very grateful that she will continue to serve as ambassador to the united nations. it's been widely known that she has been the topic. so with her withdrawing her nomination, what other names might float to the top of that list? a lot of valid questions as people start mulling this over as there are changes coming in the next few d
. everything will be on the table as john mccain, joe lieberman and lindsey graham tomorrow night. that's all for us right now. "ac 360" starts right now. >> piers, thanks. good evening, everyone. we begin as we do every night, keeping them honest. looking for facts, not supporting democrats or republicans. our goal is just report, finding the facts, finding the truth. we did that last week. again, the more we look into it, the more we find people in powerful and influential places saying things that just don't square with the facts. it's about a u.n. treaty that failed to be ratified by the senate. a treaty that was meant to encourage other countries to be more like the u.s. on equal rights of the disabled. if other countries adopted better treatment of their disabled citizens, the idea is that disabled americans who visit or live in other countries would also benefit. 125 countries ratified the treaty. it was supported by george bush, signed by the current president, and has support from both sides of the aisle like john mccain and bob dole himself a world war ii veteran. he was wheeled ont
covered intensely. the meetings that she had with john mccain and lindsey graham but more importantly with people who she mahad meetings with tha were on the fence. instead of answering what the senator thought were mundane questions, she got very defensive and the feelings about susan collins and others, if she can't deal with united states senators who are kind of fellow americans, so to speak, how is she going to be on the world stage when she's dealing with some of the world's foes. so that was a big concern here. it certainly was political as well. that was a big concern from those senators who were not as political. there's a lot of respect for her. people think that she's very, very smart, that she knows the issues. there is some concern, not just from republicans but also democrats i've talked to about her personality, whether she had the personality to be the secretary of state and to represent the u.s. on the world stage. >> those statements, i take it, from either senator mccain, lindsey graham or ayotte? >> reporter: senator graham told me especially there was no way he wa
's also deeply political, you know. john mccain is a terribly sore loser. susan rice said some things in 2008 defending her candidate for president. he's never forgiven her. lindsey graham, all the man cares about is fighting off a tea party challenger. he gets to go back to south carolina and he gets to say i thwarted the president, the newly-reelected president, and i took down a wonderful african american woman. i have to say i don't know that they're deliberately putting race in the equation, but maybe there's something unconscious about it. but a lot of the people who have been targeted in the situation have been african americans. i don't know how it works out that way. but it has. it's a sad day. susan rice will be fine. she's going to go on and do great things for the country. but we've lost a public servant. and the president has been thwarted. and i think this boeds terribly for the supposed, new bipartisan cooperation that we're all supposed to hope for. >> congresswoman, we've also seen a blatant double standard. in november, matt lowe, he con fronted mccane about why he s
state, voted against it. lindsey graham cast a no vote though john mccain was one of the treaty's biggest advocates. kelly ayotte voted for it. mississippi senator thad cochrane voted in favor and then as it was going down switched his vote to no. cochrane up in 2014. mississippi more worried about a primary than a general. this is one of of the saddest days i've seen in almost 28 years in the senate. and it needs to be a wake-up call about a broken institution that's letting down the american people. the g 0 op divide was on full display yesterday in both chambers. so was the republican attempt to move past the losses in 2012. there was a tribute to honor the late jack kemp. two men who had their eye on 2016. congressman paul ryan and marco rubio laid out their visions for expanding the appeal to the middle class. clear from the outset that the night was about moving past mitt romney. ryan welcomed rubio to the dinner, by the way, by joking about potential early state r run-ins the two of them may have ahead of them. >> i'll see you at the reunion can dinner for two. notice any
, senator john mccain's office released a statement saying, he wishes her well but will continue to seek all the facts about what happened in benghazi. last night senator lindsey graham echoed that. >> we're not going to let this go. how could for seven hours nobody come to the aid of the people during the attack? why did we leave the consulate open? where was the president when the british decided to close their consulate in june? and afterwards, how did the intelligence get so screwed up for lack of a better word? so we're going to keep pressing this so we can learn from it, not have it happen again. >> with susan rice out of the running, the spotlight immediately turns to senator john kerry. a white house official tells nbc news it's almost certain kerry will be the next secretary of state. saying, quote, there were two people on the list, two minus one is one. leaving capitol hill last night, kerry, let's just say he was coy with reporters. >> earlier today and i'm just going to continue to do my work. >> kerry released a statement praising rice as a dedicated public serveant saying in p
senator kelly ayotte along with her fellow senators, lindsey graham and john mccain in a fairly blistering assessment of the report that came out from the accountability review board on what happened in benghazi. and we have a couple of experts here who can talk about what she is senators had to say just now. judy miller, fox news contribute tore, who has made many, many trips reporting to that part of the world. rick grenell, spokesman for four u.s. ambassadors to the united nations. in particular senator graham suggested, i mean he was asking the question, essentially, what did the president know and when did he know it? there are some real questions to be asked raised by this report, this accountability review board report about what happened in benghazi. >> yeah. we were taking notes. i think actually the headline for me was that secretary clinton may have not sat for interviews for this report. senator graham was questioning whether or not she actually was interviewed. if that's the case, jon, that's outrageous that we have a sitting secretary of state who said, i take responsibility
. it was astonishing to see lindsey graham, that he opposed this. that's why i'm somewhat astonished about the depth of the 38 votes, that they would get into opposition. >> interestingly talking about veterans, john mccain supported it. another veteran. truly distinguished and a claimed veteran supported not just by his vote, but also testified in favor of it before the foreign relations relation committee. so there is a group presently serving men and women who supported this law. we don't have to go back to the bob doles or the former president bushes, and with all due respect to them, you've asked the right question. what do we do in the here and now, the present. i think there is a real potential body of strength to work outward and maybe recruit some of those senators who voted against it, and we'll have new senators who are not yet on record. >> eliot: i and many others certainly hope when you turn the corner in january i heard senator kerry say there could be hearings shine a spotlight on how flawed the arguments in opposition to the treaty were. the questions remains is this systemic of a l
a number of concerns. i read the statements by both john mccain and also some of the other senators that voted against. they're not tea party senators as senator reid is describing them. they are thoughtful people who pay attention, senators like lindsey graham, marco rubio, republicans who give -- who give a great credence to things like sovereignty and don't want to give authority to the united nations. they want the americans with disabilities act to be the golden standard by which we guide our actions. >> but isn't the treaty worded in pretty much exactly the same way as the americans with disabilities act is? >> right, which begs the question, why give any power to the united nations? let me tell you, carol, i served as ambassador to the united nations human rights. it's a bureaucratic organization with very little teeth, very little fang and ability to enforce anything. some people had concerns about not wanting to give authority to the united nations and rather keep it as a sovereign issue. i think it's a culpable concern. >> if they don't have any teeth to impose this treaty
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)